Assoc. for Women in Science

Winter 2015

AWIS Magazine covers topics important to women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine fields. Topics include career advancement, work-life balance, the state of science and technology, women’s wellness, and AWIS’ political and

Issue link: http://magazine.awis.org/i/613158

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careerplaybook STEM Education Act of 2015 C omputer science education got a boost when President Obama signed the STEM Education Act of 2015 into law this October. It includes computer science in the definition of STEM, strengthens formal and informal STEM education activities at specified federal agencies, and expands STEM teaching fellowship programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF). The STEM Education Act of 2015 was a bipartisan bill that was signed into law, thanks to Lamar Smith (R) from Texas and Elizabeth Esty (D) from Connecticut – both are members of the House of Representatives' Science, Space and Technology Committee. The committee issued a press release that quotes Esty, "More and more jobs of the 21st century require science, technology, engineering, and math skills. We need to make sure that all of our students have opportunities to thrive in STEM education. This bill strengthens our efforts at the federal level and ensures that criti - cal computer science skills are included among STEM subjects." Committee chairman Smith states, "The STEM Education Act expands the definition of STEM, encourages students to study these subjects and trains more teachers." What does this mean for those in STEM? Those pursuing a mas- ter's degree or with a background in computer science are now eligible for Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships which support math and science graduates who want to one day teach. The STEM Education Act of 2015 also expands what STEM programs can be run and funded by federal government agencies to include computer science. Museums, nature centers and other organizations can also benefit from the newly signed bill. The STEM Education Act of 2015 allows the National Science Foundation to continue to fund STEM-related out-of-school and informal education programs. = Computer Science Now Officially Part of STEM 21 your network | your resource | your voice COMP SCI STEM p p mmittee. ed a press release that quotes Esty, "More e 21st century require science, technology, th skills. We need to make sure that all of our t s s. e eed to a e su e t at a o ou rtunities to thrive in STEM education. This bill rts at the federal level and ensures that criti - e skills are included among STEM subjects." n Smith states, "The STEM nds the definition of p Museums, nature centers and other organizations can also benefit from the newly signed bill. The STEM Education Act of 2015 allows the National Science Foundation to continue to fund STEM-related out-of-school and informal education to u d S e ated out o sc oo a d o a educat o programs. = 21 your network | your resource | your voice

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